Okonomi BK

oko 1

There are many sides to Okonomi.

By day, Okonomi serves traditional Japanese ichiju-sansai set meals for breakfast and lunch.

In the evenings, Okonomi becomes YUJI Ramen and offers an à la carte menu of seafood-rich ramen and mazemen.

In all its various forms, Okonomi strives to embody the Mottainai philosophy of minimizing waste and appreciating what is given. We source our seafood from the Atlantic Ocean. We shop for produce from local farmer’s markets. We make our ceramics with an artist based in upstate New York. Our greatest challenge is to honor the life in what surrounds us. (Source: http://www.okonomibk.com/home)


On a pleasantly shaded block, you'll find the cozy Okonomi nestled underneath big and bountiful trees in a low clapboard house, beyond the hustle and bustle of Metropolitan Avenue in Brooklyn, NY.

oko 2

I discovered Okonomi through watching my favorite show, Master of None. The main protagonist is Dev Shah, who has a passion for eating food all around NY and works as a food show host who eats at hip new places, and in one particular episode (Episode 10: Buona Notte), he stops in Okonomi.

Living a 20 minute drive away from Williamsburg, I decided today would be the day I'd head over. Upon arriving, I walked up to a warm and inviting restaurant front. The place itself is tiny- only seating 12 patrons at a time, so it is suggested to go with a small group, or even better, by yourself (which is what I did). Due to how limited the spacing is, the wait list can get to be pretty long- approximately an hour to an hour and a half depending on your party. Not to mention, you need to put down a $20 deposit (cash or credit) in order to secure your spot in line.

 

Okonomi has a traditional set breakfast & lunch menu by day. Okonomi mimics the style of serving called Ichiju Sansai; which translates to one soup, three sides. There is no written menu, but rather it is spoken to you. You have the choice out of a small selection of fish, and the rest is already set by the chef. 

 From left to right: 7 grain rice topped with bonito flakes, onsen egg topped with bright-hot shichimi togarashi, Big Eye tuna belly, marinated in sake kasu (sake lees), sweet corn with shiraea tofu and mise hyssop, baked tamagoyaki, tsukemono - yuza pickles, shishito peppers with cherry tomato and a kimizu sauce (egg sauce), roasted squash and eggplant topped with a blueberry derigaku miso, miso soup, and a roasted barley tea (mugicha)

From left to right: 7 grain rice topped with bonito flakes, onsen egg topped with bright-hot shichimi togarashi, Big Eye tuna belly, marinated in sake kasu (sake lees), sweet corn with shiraea tofu and mise hyssop, baked tamagoyaki, tsukemono - yuza pickles, shishito peppers with cherry tomato and a kimizu sauce (egg sauce), roasted squash and eggplant topped with a blueberry derigaku miso, miso soup, and a roasted barley tea (mugicha)

The presentation of the plates are minimalistic and clean, yet so visually striking. Each individual dish had its own collection of unique yet compatible flavors. 

oko 4

 

       ♥

 

♥        P.S. I could solely live off of the soft egg and rice *drools*

♥                   

 

                                  ♥

 

 

♥